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Article: Volume 49 Number 2 Page 145 - February 2022

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  Dental Update 497: 145-146

Oral surgery:  Palatal hyperplasia associated with hereditary gingival fibromatosis

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Abstract: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a benign, non-haemorrhagic, fibrous gingival overgrowth of unknown cause. Clinically, gingivae can be seen to partially or fully cover teeth, and can limit oral function, for example eating, speaking, and maintaining oral hygiene. HGF normally starts in the transition between the primary and secondary dentition. Surgical excision is often required. This case describes the management of a 37-year-old male with generalized HGF with extensive bilateral palatal growths extending into the oropharynx; not a reported presentation of HGF. Awareness of the condition and familial history could aid management at an earlier stage.

Clinical relevance: This article describes the management of an uncommon presentation of hereditary gingival fibromatosis in the palate that affected the patient’s oral function.

Author notes: Amy Patrick, BDS, MFDS RCPS Glas, MSc (Lon), BSc (Lon), MOral Surg (RCS Eng), Specialist Oral Surgeon, Royal National ENT and Eastman Dental Hospitals, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust, London. Adesh Savla, BDS (Hons), PGCert Dent Ed, Specialty Doctor, Department of Oral Surgery, Royal National ENT and Eastman Dental Hospitals, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust, London. Josiah Eyeson, FDSRCS (Eng), PhD, FDS (OS), FHEA, Consultant Oral Surgeon, Department of Oral Surgery, Royal National ENT and Eastman Dental Hospitals, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust, London. email: adesh.savla@nhs.net

Objective: The reader should understand the effect of hereditary gingival fibromatosis on oral function, together with the clinical management and outcome.

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