Article: Volume 44 Number 3 Page 201 - March 2017

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  Dent Update 2017; 44: 201-208

Sedation and Special Care Dentistry:  Periodontal Treatment in Patients with Learning Disabilities Part 2: Professional Mechanical Intervention

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Abstract: The first part of this two part series discussed the potential barriers and risk factors that may lead to an increased incidence and severity of periodontal disease amongst patients with learning disabilities. Additionally, preventive strategies and tools that can be used by general dental practitioners, oral health promotion teams as well as specialists within the field to control and prevent disease progression were explored. To prevent periodontal disease progression and attain optimal periodontal health, a combination of prevention and professional mechanical instrumentation is usually required. The second part of the series concentrates on the role of the dental professional in implementing professional mechanical instrumentation to attempt to reduce the burden of disease further in this patient group.

Clinical relevance: Although research continues into which professional techniques for instrumentation are the most successful amongst patients with periodontal disease, very little data specifically explore the needs of patients with learning disabilities, despite their high unmet needs. This paper aims to report on any available data present to produce suggestions for care.

Author notes: Shazia Kaka, BDS, MJDF(RCS), Specialty Registrar (STR) in Sedation and Special Care Dentistry, Oxfordshire Healthcare Foundation Trust and Chris Dickinson, BDS, LDS(RCS), MSC(Pros Dent), DPDH(RCS), DipDSed, MFDS(RCS), Consultant in Special Care Dentistry, Guy’s Hospital and Honorary Senior Specialist Clinical Teacher, King’s College London Dental Institute, Bessemer Road, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RW, UK.

Objective: To review professional mechanical interventions that may be used to lower the risk of periodontal disease in this patient cohort.

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